This is nothing new, but it’s been in my drafts’ box for a while, waiting for me to write a comment. I was just finishing a post on some Korean movies that were screened in São Paulo International Film Festival and as I couldn’t prepare the pictures in time for it to go up now, before I leave for work, I decided to postpone it ‘til tonight and publish this one.
So, to sum it up, a short story written by a Korean writer made it all the way to The New Yorker. Great news indeed, right? Click through to learn more about it.
And if you’re interested in Korean literature and would like a bit of a background on why it has been gaining recognition and also get to know a few writers, this article on The Korea Times is a good start. Korean Modern Literature in Translation is also a great source on the subject. Be sure to pay the site a visit!
(via Yi Mun-yol short story in The New Yorker, a first! | subject object verb)
Check out more posts from this collaboration HERE.Check out the other collaborators’ blogs here.Check out The Korea Blog!

This is nothing new, but it’s been in my drafts’ box for a while, waiting for me to write a comment. I was just finishing a post on some Korean movies that were screened in São Paulo International Film Festival and as I couldn’t prepare the pictures in time for it to go up now, before I leave for work, I decided to postpone it ‘til tonight and publish this one.

So, to sum it up, a short story written by a Korean writer made it all the way to The New Yorker. Great news indeed, right? Click through to learn more about it.

And if you’re interested in Korean literature and would like a bit of a background on why it has been gaining recognition and also get to know a few writers, this article on The Korea Times is a good start. Korean Modern Literature in Translation is also a great source on the subject. Be sure to pay the site a visit!

(via Yi Mun-yol short story in The New Yorker, a first! | subject object verb)


Check out more posts from this collaboration HERE.
Check out the other collaborators’ blogs here.
Check out The Korea Blog!

"Have you ever wondered why so many Korean horror movies feature girls with loose long hair in white hanbok? And why most of them are so pale with sorrow? And why so many of them seem to be haunting schools?
Summer is the season for horror. Among many Korean ways to beat the heat, a favorite method is to break out in a cold sweat by scaring oneself silly. As a result, many horror movies are released in the summer and horror specials are broadcast on TV.
So why are long-haired girls in white hanbok the stars of summer horror? Let’s take a look…”
(by Suzy Chung, via Chilled to the bone: Korean ghosts and urban legends | The Korea Blog)

"Have you ever wondered why so many Korean horror movies feature girls with loose long hair in white hanbok? And why most of them are so pale with sorrow? And why so many of them seem to be haunting schools?

Summer is the season for horror. Among many Korean ways to beat the heat, a favorite method is to break out in a cold sweat by scaring oneself silly. As a result, many horror movies are released in the summer and horror specials are broadcast on TV.

So why are long-haired girls in white hanbok the stars of summer horror? Let’s take a look…”

(by Suzy Chung, via Chilled to the bone: Korean ghosts and urban legends | The Korea Blog)

Pak Min-gyu’s “Sponge Cake” Translated by KTLIT

I am sort of working on a few posts on Korean literature (or, rather, the few books/authors/stories I know), but they won’t be out so soon because I want to try and make them as interesting as possible, in order to, maybe, encourage one or two people to give it a try. I’m no literary critic, but since I’m a journalist, I think it’s only fair I try to write a balanced and informative piece without opinions like “it’s fun reading” or “it sucks” like I have before in here (well, sometimes I’m too lazy to research and put some effort into writing, what can I say?). Actually, there’s a post about the Portable Library of Korean Fiction that is more like a presentation and, therefore, will hopefully be ready in a few days.

So, for now, click on the title to entertain yourselves with Sponge Cake, a Park Min-gyu short story, translated by Ed Park and edited by Charles Montgomery of KTLIT

(If you like it, be sure to check Korean Standards, also written by Park and translated by Brother Anthony of Taizé.)


Check out more posts from this collaboration HERE.
Check out the other collaborators’ blogs here.
Check out The Korea Blog!

Sneak peeks: Koran festival and literature

The 6th Korean Culture Festival took place last weekend in São Paulo and it was quite good. There were lots of thing to see and eat (yay!), but my only complaint goes to all the space given to kpop. I mean, I like pop music as much as the next person and I’m even slightly obsessed with Big Bang, but there’s so much more about Korean Culture that I’d like to see in an event like this… Anyway, I’m still choosing and editing photographs, so the post on it will be published this weekend. A sneak peek below, the main stage.

# The Portable Library of Korean Literature

Given my background, it was only a matter of time before I got all tangled up in Korean literature and started buying books to understand more about its culture. So, five or six weeks ago, I ordered some books from Amazon and they arrived today. Well, four of them did; for some reason, one of them was shipped separately one day later. I got Waxen Wings: The Acta Koreana Anthology of Short Fiction from Korea, The Red Room: Stories of Trauma in Contemporary Korea, Photo Shop Murder (by Kim Young-ha) and The Dwarf (by Choi Se-hui).

Straight away, the most interesting one is Photo Shop Murder, but not specifically because of its style, since I haven’t read it yet, but because it belongs to this really nice collection that showcases Korean authors. An extract that explains it much better:

"The Portable Library of Korean Literature introduces readers around the world to the depth and breadth of a vibrant literary tradition that heretofore has been little known outside of Korea. These small books, each devoted to a single writer, will be appreciated for their originality, for their universality and for their broad range of styles and themes. The goal of The Portable Library of Korean Literature is to bring Korean creative writing into the maisntream of world literature.”

So, expect posts on that, too!


Check out more posts from this collaboration HERE.
Check out the other collaborators’ blogs here.
Check out The Korea Blog!