random cute stuff i find while wasting my time online, lots of diy/décor inspiration and the occasional zombie-related post.
-nana

Read the Printed Word!

2013 Reading Challenge

2013 Reading Challenge
Nana has read 19 books toward a goal of 50 books.
hide
19 of 50 (38%)
view books
"Korean culture"

A (very) late 2011 recap, part 1: Hangul Day

koreaonmymind:

I had originally thought about publishing this and some other posts about Korean events that happened in 2011 before the year ended, but things were hectic and, well, I lost my flash drive with the cropped pictures. Better late than never, of course, but I feel a bit about being such a mess in the recent times. Anyway, let’s move on!

Small “shrine” to King Sejong

To celebrate Hangul Day in 2011, USP’s group of Korean studies got together with the Korea Foundation and the South Korean consulate to create the exhibition “Hangul, more than an alphabet”. The event took place in one of the university’s libraries and offered visitors information on the origin of Hangul, as well as showcasing some objects with Hangul characters, poems and kids books written by Korean authors and translated into Portuguese (great, but what about a few grown-up books, too?).

Korean kids books translated into Portuguese

The posters on how Hangul works (below) were not completely new to me, since they were the same ones featured in that cultural festival I attended months ago. That wasn’t a problem, though, because, in all honesty, I hadn’t read them before. =p

After going through them, I learnt a few things, like how the Korean language, with its 72 million speakers, is the 14th most spoken language in the world and one of the few to have its own writing system. Other interesting findings include the fact that the vowels were created based on three fundamental elements - sky, earth and man.

Seo Jeong-ju’s Beside a chrysanthemum; part of Yi Sang’s Wings; Kim Chun-su’s Flower

Of course, these facts can probably be found on Wikipedia (which has, apparently, a quite complete page on Hangul), but I do hate using the internet for reading/studying long texts - I get headaches -, so having the chance to check the posters out was quite fortunate.

Facsimile of Hunminjeongeum, the 1446 document that describes the Korean alphabet

But what I found really interesting was something else. Because of the wide range of sounds that the Korean alphabet can represent, it was deemed by linguists the alphabet best fit to render languages that have no written form. And, in fact, something like this was attempted with some of the inhabitants of Bau-Bau, a city located in the Indonesian island of Buton. Since the Roman alphabet cannot represent many of the sounds in the native language of the Cia-Cia tribe, Hangul was suggested as an alternative and teachers were even sent from Korea. Now, apparently the project was discontinued, but you can read more about it here and here.

A couple more pictures I took there:

Random objects embellished with the Korean characters

Jan 29th, 2012
This is nothing new, but it’s been in my drafts’ box for a while, waiting for me to write a comment. I was just finishing a post on some Korean movies that were screened in São Paulo International Film Festival and as I couldn’t prepare the pictures in time for it to go up now, before I leave for work, I decided to postpone it ‘til tonight and publish this one.
So, to sum it up, a short story written by a Korean writer made it all the way to The New Yorker. Great news indeed, right? Click through to learn more about it.
And if you’re interested in Korean literature and would like a bit of a background on why it has been gaining recognition and also get to know a few writers, this article on The Korea Times is a good start. Korean Modern Literature in Translation is also a great source on the subject. Be sure to pay the site a visit!
(via Yi Mun-yol short story in The New Yorker, a first! | subject object verb)
Check out more posts from this collaboration HERE.Check out the other collaborators’ blogs here.Check out The Korea Blog!

This is nothing new, but it’s been in my drafts’ box for a while, waiting for me to write a comment. I was just finishing a post on some Korean movies that were screened in São Paulo International Film Festival and as I couldn’t prepare the pictures in time for it to go up now, before I leave for work, I decided to postpone it ‘til tonight and publish this one.

So, to sum it up, a short story written by a Korean writer made it all the way to The New Yorker. Great news indeed, right? Click through to learn more about it.

And if you’re interested in Korean literature and would like a bit of a background on why it has been gaining recognition and also get to know a few writers, this article on The Korea Times is a good start. Korean Modern Literature in Translation is also a great source on the subject. Be sure to pay the site a visit!

(via Yi Mun-yol short story in The New Yorker, a first! | subject object verb)


Check out more posts from this collaboration HERE.
Check out the other collaborators’ blogs here.
Check out The Korea Blog!

Nov 10th, 2011

Korea on Instagram

As much as I love seeing those professional pictures of touristic places from all over the world, I do prefer snapshots of everyday life because I’m always super curious about how people live in faraway places and how they look at their surroundings. That’s why I love Instagram. I mean, where else can one get constant updates from people that are, in some cases, on the other side of the world so easily?

And I do mean on the other side of the world. A few of my favourites instagramers live in Korea and share everyday a piece of their life with everybody. It is truly amazing to see mundane things and aspects of people’s lives portrayed with so much creativity and care.

That’s why I decided to show a few of these pictures in here. They are ordered alphabetically by the usernames and all of ‘em have said username pasted on a corner. Also, if you click them, you’ll be redirected to their “official” page online. Enjoy!

Click below to see all the other pictures!

Read More

Oct 21st, 2011
There’s more to Korea than K-pop, y’all! I’m slowly learning to like the sugary songs from groups like Girls Generation, but I still prefer something a bit less, ahn, cute. This article from The Korea Blog talks a little about 11 bands that are featured in the album Them and Us, released by the promoting group World Domination, Inc. (WDI). There are links to the bands’ fanpages on Facebook plus links to the original songs they cover in the aforementioned album. Do check it out!
(via Korea’s punks prepare for World Domination | The Korea Blog)

Check out more posts from this collaboration HERE.Check out the other collaborators’ blogs here.Check out The Korea Blog!

There’s more to Korea than K-pop, y’all! I’m slowly learning to like the sugary songs from groups like Girls Generation, but I still prefer something a bit less, ahn, cute. This article from The Korea Blog talks a little about 11 bands that are featured in the album Them and Us, released by the promoting group World Domination, Inc. (WDI). There are links to the bands’ fanpages on Facebook plus links to the original songs they cover in the aforementioned album. Do check it out!

(via Korea’s punks prepare for World Domination | The Korea Blog)


Check out more posts from this collaboration HERE.
Check out the other collaborators’ blogs here.
Check out The Korea Blog!

Oct 20th, 2011

The Busan International Film Festival took place in the beginning of October in, surprise, surprise, Busan, South Korea. This video shows a little bit of the atmosphere in its surrounding area and a few visitors’ comments.

(via Busan International Film Festival(BIFF))


Check out more posts from this collaboration HERE.
Check out the other collaborators’ blogs here.
Check out The Korea Blog!

Oct 18th, 2011
"Have you ever wondered why so many Korean horror movies feature girls with loose long hair in white hanbok? And why most of them are so pale with sorrow? And why so many of them seem to be haunting schools?
Summer is the season for horror. Among many Korean ways to beat the heat, a favorite method is to break out in a cold sweat by scaring oneself silly. As a result, many horror movies are released in the summer and horror specials are broadcast on TV.
So why are long-haired girls in white hanbok the stars of summer horror? Let’s take a look…”
(by Suzy Chung, via Chilled to the bone: Korean ghosts and urban legends | The Korea Blog)

"Have you ever wondered why so many Korean horror movies feature girls with loose long hair in white hanbok? And why most of them are so pale with sorrow? And why so many of them seem to be haunting schools?

Summer is the season for horror. Among many Korean ways to beat the heat, a favorite method is to break out in a cold sweat by scaring oneself silly. As a result, many horror movies are released in the summer and horror specials are broadcast on TV.

So why are long-haired girls in white hanbok the stars of summer horror? Let’s take a look…”

(by Suzy Chung, via Chilled to the bone: Korean ghosts and urban legends | The Korea Blog)

Sep 12th, 2011
Now, how cute is this kid donning a hanbok?

Now, how cute is this kid donning a hanbok?

(via thingsaboutsouthkorea)

Aug 19th, 2011

Korea, rampant cinema - the revenge thriller

For someone who got to know Korean cinema for the first time many, many years ago through Park Chan-wook’s Oldboy, this second edition of CCSP’s Korean film festival (15-30 July) was an amazing event. The main focus was on revenge thrillers, so they couldn’t let The Vengeance Trilogy out, could they? But since not everything is about revenge, the festival also focused on movies that hit it big at the box office and presented a retrospective of one other well-known director, Kim Ji-woon. The selction was indeed varied, so the movie-goers could watch Im Kwon-taek’s 천년학 (Beyond the years), about a family of 판소리 (pansori) performers, in a day and 검은집 (Black House), a slasher film, on the other. There were three sessions a day and since they tried to preserve the same mood by choosing similar-themed films, it was not hard at all to sit through all three of them in a row.

Read More

Aug 11th, 2011

VI Festival of Korean Culture (São Paulo) - part 3

Finally, the last part is here! I’ll be honest and say that my stalling this time had more to do with the fact that I’m not thaaat into K-pop and, therefore, don’t feel I’m all that qualified to say anything about cover bands. That and I also lost the program, so I don’t really know the names of most bands that performed. =(

Anyway, I really wanna talk about that movie festival and about some books I’ve read recently, so I just figured it’d be best to get this out of my way as soon as possible.

There’s no denying that most of the youngsters that attended this festival were there because of the K-pop attractions. Besides the presentations in the main stage, there was also a smaller stage, so instead of watching some of the traditional acts, teens could be sort of immersed in Korean pop music all day long.

The picture below was taken in the last day of the festival, around 7 o’clock, I guess. It was definitely crowded and people were having a lot of fun watching the groups.

Read More

Aug 8th, 2011

Korean movies under the spotlight in São Paulo

Starting today (15/07), CCSP presents the second edition of their Korean cinema exhibition. Titled "Coreia, cinema explosivo: o thriller de vingança" (Korea, rampant cinema: the revenge thriller), the event will introduce 12 unreleased movies (in Brazil, that is) and will also showcase a few flicks by well-known filmmakers like Park Chan-wook (the Vengeance Trilogy and Thirst) and Kim Ji-woon (The good, the bad and the weird, A tale of two sisters).

The exhibition goes on until the end of July and most movies will have reruns.

Coreia, cinema explosivo: o thriller de vingança
@ Sala Lima Barreto, CCSP (R. Vergueiro, 1000 - Paraíso)
from 15/07 to 30/07

Go here to check movie summaries, dates and times (in Portuguese). 


Check out more posts from this collaboration HERE.
Check out the other collaborators’ blogs here.
Check out The Korea Blog!

Jul 15th, 2011

VI Festival of Korean Culture (São Paulo) - part 2

Better late than never, right? After almost one month, the second part of this series is here, yay! I’m not even going to waste time with excuses, so let’s get to the good stuff.

So, quick recap: on Part 1, we took a peek at what was going on the outer part of the event, mainly, since that’s what I did on the first day I went there. And even though I did go inside the cultural center to see the exhibitions then, I ended up not taking a single picture, so that’s what the second day was for. On Sunday, I was all by myself (on the day before, I was accompanied by some lovely folks from my class) so I could wander around more freely and stay as long as I wanted checking things out.

Read More

Jul 7th, 2011
More lotus lanterns!
Through the link below, you can buy a diy kit to make lotus lanterns like the one above, but i think that, once you have a metal frame and the elctrical parts of the lamp, replicating this wouldn’t be too hard.
Now, you’ll be all set for next year’s Festival, right? ;)
(via Make a Korea Lotus Lantern Lotus Lamp D.I.Y | eBay)
Check out more posts from this collaboration HERE.Check out the other collaborators’ blogs here.Check out The Korea Blog!

More lotus lanterns!

Through the link below, you can buy a diy kit to make lotus lanterns like the one above, but i think that, once you have a metal frame and the elctrical parts of the lamp, replicating this wouldn’t be too hard.

Now, you’ll be all set for next year’s Festival, right? ;)

(via Make a Korea Lotus Lantern Lotus Lamp D.I.Y | eBay)


Check out more posts from this collaboration HERE.
Check out the other collaborators’ blogs here.
Check out The Korea Blog!

Jun 29th, 2011
Lovely story: Peaches, from Aunt Peaches, was inspired to make this lantern after listening to stories from a friend that lived in Seoul some years ago. An excerpt from her original post:
"Apparently, every May, the good people of South Korea celebrate Buddah’s birthday with the Lotus Lantern Festival, a time when everyone in town decks the streets with thousands of beautiful paper lanterns. They make them out of paper cups and tissue paper, then hang them from trees and fence posts and exchange them with strangers. Doesn’t that sound wonderful? Can you imagine a whole giant city lit up with paper lanterns? Man, I got to get to South Korea in the Springtime!”
I have to agree with her, it must be something wonderful to see in person, other than just in pictures.
Anyway, we’re not in Seoul (well, I'm not in Seoul, I'm sure lots of people are) and May has long passed, but still this is a pretty simple project that one can make to cheer up a room somewhere. Personally, I'd make lots of them to hang on my bedroom, then close my eyes and imagine I'm enjoying the joys of Korean spring. =)
(via Aunt Peaches: Friday Flowers: Ruffled Lotus Lantern)


Check out more posts from this collaboration HERE.Check out the other collaborators’ blogs here.Check out The Korea Blog!

Lovely story: Peaches, from Aunt Peaches, was inspired to make this lantern after listening to stories from a friend that lived in Seoul some years ago. An excerpt from her original post:

"Apparently, every May, the good people of South Korea celebrate Buddah’s birthday with the Lotus Lantern Festival, a time when everyone in town decks the streets with thousands of beautiful paper lanterns. They make them out of paper cups and tissue paper, then hang them from trees and fence posts and exchange them with strangers. Doesn’t that sound wonderful? Can you imagine a whole giant city lit up with paper lanterns? Man, I got to get to South Korea in the Springtime!”

I have to agree with her, it must be something wonderful to see in person, other than just in pictures.

Anyway, we’re not in Seoul (well, I'm not in Seoul, I'm sure lots of people are) and May has long passed, but still this is a pretty simple project that one can make to cheer up a room somewhere. Personally, I'd make lots of them to hang on my bedroom, then close my eyes and imagine I'm enjoying the joys of Korean spring. =)

(via Aunt Peaches: Friday Flowers: Ruffled Lotus Lantern)

Check out more posts from this collaboration HERE.
Check out the other collaborators’ blogs here.
Check out The Korea Blog!

Jun 29th, 2011

What’s for (Korean) breakfast?

A couple months ago, an article that dissected breakfast in different countries was published in the gastronomy pages of a Brazilian newspaper and it also revealed what Koreans eat in the morning. 

Below, a scan of the main, more general piece; the rest of it was divided into sections that dealt with breakfast in specific countries. The title, “Sai um pingado com bulgogui”, makes reference to a very common breakfast drink in Brazil, the pingado, made with coffee and a few drops (pingos, in Portuguese) of milk. Koreans, though, “find nothing as familiar as starting the day with rice, bulgogi, kimchi and some soup”, states the highlighted part.

But this is not the end of it! Korean breakfast got a special, more detailed mention. Click below to see the scan and read the translated text!

Read More

Jun 16th, 2011

VI Festival of Korean Culture (São Paulo) - part 1

At last, the post on that Festival of Korean Culture that I attended in the end of May. Actually this will be a three part “series”, because there are a lot of interesting pictures (even if there weren’t, the post would be too long, anyway). So, on this first part, I’ll focus on outlining the event and talking about what I did on Saturday. The second part, will deal with a few of the exhibitions held during the festival and other things that I was able to check out on Sunday. The last part will be the K-pop one, as the Festival was packed with K-pop fans and K-pop music and K-pop dance groups and all things K-pop!

Before leading you to my account of what happened, I have to say that all photos here were taken by me. They’re not good ‘cause I suck at photography, but if you still feel like reposting any of them for any reason, just link them back to this post, please. =)

Now, click below for the full text and loads of pictures and enjoy!

(Or check out more posts from my collaboration with The Korea Blog HERE.)

Read More

Jun 14th, 2011